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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 296 (some duplicates have been removed)
, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." the taliban continued to attack nato forces, but one u.s. senator tells us american troops must leave the country even sooner. a long march across africa for these somali refugees. the threat of drought and civil war has driven them to desperation. >> we can scale up our operation to meet the growing need. this crisis could turn into a catastrophe. >> and a royal welcome in one of canada's most remote regions. the duke and duchess of cambridge get a taste of the great outdoors. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and to our viewers across the globe. stop bombing, stop fighting, and joined the political process. that is what the british prime minister, david cameron, asked the taliban today. but even as he spoke those words on the second day of his visit to afghanistan, for nato's silk -- for nato soldiers were killed. which all begs -- which all begs the question, what happens when foreign forces withdraw? >> british troops drop in. it's an area the taliban used to control. no longer. nato is pushing out. that is
troops. i think we can all agree, at least i hope we can, that the taliban has morphed into a hybrid. it's one part terrorist organization, one part global drug trafficking organization. for the past two years virtually every heroin processing lab raided by the dea, united stat s special forces and afghan police had ties to the taliban.ice what our forces find when they raid drug labs is not only large quantities of opium and heroin,d but heroin, but also also im explosive devices, bomb making materials, and taliban training manuals. in just one raid last year, 2,056 pounds of the highest grade heroin with wholesale value of $6 million was seized. experts agree it may take many years to get the drug trade in afghanistan under control. therefore, as the united states military begins to scale back its presence this month, i think we've got to ensure our civilians continue to support counter narcotics efforts in afghanistan. i think that's really important. a year ago this month this caucus released a bipartisan report entitled united states counter narcotics strategy in afghanistan, which
forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
led political entitlement. the death of bin laden presents the taliban with a moment of choice. al qaeda are weakened. their leader is dead. last month the u n adopted two separate sanctions regimes creating a clear distinction to separate taliban from al qaeda. local peace councils havbeen established in almost all afghanistan's provinces allow 1800 people from 17 provinces to be enrolled for reintegration. we should take this opportunity to send a clear message to the taliban that now is the time to break al qaeda and participate in a peaceful political process. in this task we need pakistan's assistance. as i discussed last week as much in pakistan's interest as britain or afghanistan. the taliban pose a more wolf read to the states of pakistan as well. mr. speaker there is no reason afghanistan should be destined to remain a broken country. it has fertile agricultural land and stands at the crossroads of asia's training program. it has succeeded in the past when not wracked by conflict. afghanistan has many challenges ahead. there are security issues and lack of government capa
to haunt them. u.s. and the taliban. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. >> it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: with little more than a week until the debt ceiling deadline, lawmakers on both sides of capitol hill offered competing plans today on how to avert a crisis. and late today,
. >> al qaeda is under more pressure than at any time since 9/11. >> reporter: still this deadly taliban raid on a hotel in kabul last week shows insurgents aren't willing to go quietly. >> if we don't succeed here and the taliban comes back into power we'll be attacked again. >> reporter: while the debate continues, american troops are carrying on with their mission preparing to hand over security back to the afghan people, the drawdown is set to begin this month. terrell, some initial diplomatic moves have been made to jumpstart peace talks with the taliban but on his trip senator mccain saw no signs whatsoever the taliban is ready to talk peace. >> joel brown in washington for thus morning, thank you so much. >>> overseas, thailand elected its first ever female prime minister by a landslide, comes from a political family, her brother was once prime minister but ousted by a military coup in 2006. the country will go along with the election results. >>> peace activists plan to sail from greece today even though the greek government banned their ships from going to gaza. protests yesterd
host, the taliban, in both pakistan and afghanistan. in pakistan, osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it's too early to tell for certain, initial evidence suggests we have halted the taliban insurgency in the heartland of helmand province. mr. speaker, we are now entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces more training and mentoring. as president obama said in his address last month, the mission is changing from combat to support. when we arrived, there was no one to hand over to, no proper army, no police force. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. mr. speaker, success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure that the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. now, i know there have been well-known problems, especially, with the afghan po
experience in the south. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coalition soldiers and the taliban will move on foot. the coalition has helicopters, but then they are back to walking around on foot. this is a lot less useful and they are optimized for -- in places like this you see more small arms fire, lots of snipers. this looks like a street battle in world war two, on a smaller scale. people throwing grenades and things like this. on the coalition side, there i
right now to go ahead and get the kids out of the room, but this is a video released by taliban insurgents in pakistan and it shows more than a dozen men believed to be pakistani policemen lined up. there they are, against the backdrop of the hillside with their hands tied behind their backs facing several men with rifles on the right side of your screen. this man shouting is accusing them of killing children in a crime against islam. and there they are, the men opening fire. now we froze the video right there because if you continue to watch, it gets even more graphic, even more brutal from that point on. c nrks nr cnn's reza sayah is taking up from here. >> reporter: we warn you, this is explicit video, some of you may find this very disturbing, if you want to turn away, this is a good time to do so. we want to walk you through the video, it shows at least 14 men lined up, all of them wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them appear to have their hands tied behind their back. we assume these are taliban fighters, one of them is scolding the man who are lined up, saying t
released by taliban showing 16 men being executed. >> this is a graphic look at how brutal and ugly the war against the taliban can get. some of you may find this very disturbing. if you would like to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through this video. it was released by the taliban, posted online. men wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them with their hands tied behind their back. in front of them, you see three armed men, you assume these are taliban fighters. one of them is scolding the men who are lined up, accusing them of being enemies of islam, saying these executions are about to take place for six children. the military here vehemently denies those excuses took place. after the scolding is over, that's when you see and hear the gunfire. you see the men topple to the ground, some of them moaning and writhing in pain. we're not going so show you what happened next. some of the gunmen walk up to the men and shoot them again, sometimes in an effort too make sure they're dead. the military believes the men who were killed were police officers kidnapped du
of money. >>> in the line of fire. cnn is embedded with u.s. troops in afghanistan when the taliban attack. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in the situation room. a special gathering to tackle america's serious economic problems. key figures from government, business and academia came together this week in chicago for the clinton global might be difference america conference. the event was the brainchild of former president bill clinton. i sat down with him in chicago for a candid interview on the country's debt crisis, the 2012 presidential race, and much more. >> mr. president, thanks very much for joining us. good to be here. first time you've done this as far as the u.s. economy is concerned. normally it's global issues. and i want to get to that, but let's talk about some of the big issues right now. jobs, jobs, jobs. it's a crisis, a game of chicken going on in washington right now between the president, the did democrats on one side, republican leadership on the other side. how big of a deal is this august 2nd deadli
are there to battle taliban coming in from afghanistan. >> reporter: kunar in eastern afghanistan is some of the toughest terrain america has troops in here. you can see this particular base is surrounded by hills on either side, which give the insurgency a central vantage point from which they can attack. the base violence is so consistent it makes it very hard for them to have the kind of contact with locals they need. life here really a waiting game for the worst to happen. everywhere you look, here in kunar on afghanistan's eastern border, the choices aren't good. outpost king is caught between hills full of taliban. if the americans leave, militants from pakistan will flow through the valley. if they stay, every few days this happens. the mortars hit the base. the last attack was long enough ago there's panic, they're worried the taliban have been preparing a big one. after days of nothing, the insurgents are finally beginning an attack from all sides. >> fire. >> command hustle up, grab it and get ready. >> reporter: they use mortars first, aiming for taliban dark into the hills but
made in the last year and reclaiminghe former taliban ronghold particularly in the south. another major change in the last year is the surge in afghan security forces. there are now 100,000 more afghan security forces than 18 months ago when president obama announced the surge and another 70,000 afghan soldiers and police will be trained and equipped by the end of next summer when all 33,000 u.s. search trips will have withdrwn. in the testimony to congress last week, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mollen characterized the president's decision as, quote, more aggressive and incurring more risk than mcraven had initially recommended. however, admiral mullen felt, could come only the president and the end can really determine the acceptable level of risk we must take because as he put it, quote, the truth is we would have run other kind of risks by keeping more forces in afghanistan onger. and among the other risks for the risks of perpetuating the greater afgh dependent on the forces and inhibiting the growth and keep the devotee and confidence on the part of the afgha
by other guards. the taliban says the shooter was working for them. ahmed wali karzai was accused by the u.s. and local afghans of being involved in the drug trade and other illegal activities. president karzai spoke to reporters about two hours after the shooting, saying only that quote, this is the life of the afghan people, this sorrow is in every afghan home. >>> high above earth, a final walk in space. these are live pictures that we are bringing to all of you. two crew members of the international space station, you see it here, venturing out on the last space walk of nasa's space shuttle era. absolutely breathtaking. the two floated over the yucatan peninsula. take a look at these live pictures. their job today is to recover a broken pump and stow it in the cargo bay of shuttle "atlantis" which docked with the space station on sunday. the space walk was scheduled to last about six hours. the "atlantis" mission is the last of the 30-year shuttle program. "atlantis" due to return to earth on july 21st. >>> on the afghan battlefield, it was an act above and beyond the call of duty. arm
and 395. charley. >> thanks a lot. >>> it is because of a text message a false message that left taliban officials speaking out. >> what they are denying and how they say the rumor got started in the first place. that story is coming up next. >>> also, libyan rebels are stationed close to the countries and leaders and troops. why they call it a close encounter and what they are guarding. you are watching "good morning maryland" first and only at 4:30. another look at the capitol. much work to be done in the nation's capitol. >>> now "good morning maryland at 4:30. >>> this morning the taliban wants the world to know their leader is not dead. the spokesman are denying reports that the insurgent gripe's leader is not dead. it was a claim from a text message sent to journalist and they are saying it's a fake and the result of a phone hack. rumors spread that he died and earlier text messages said he was dead. >>> a behind-the-scenes look at rebelsing more march cay calfy. for them it's about -- mow march qaddafi. it's about protecting what they have. that's an around the clock job to make s
in kandahar. word of his death spread, the taliban quickly took responsibility claiming they hired a hitman to carry out the killing, but u.s. officials are not so sure and are working to gather more intelligence. this afternoon, condemning in the strongest possible terms the killing of karzai. with more on these stories we're joined by msnbc's chief foreign corresponde correspondent in kandahar. what new details have you learned about the killing? >> reporter: we've spoken to witnesses in kandahar. we've also spoken to people who were at karzai's -- the person killed today, not president karzai, of course, his half brother, we spoke to people who are at the house, the residence in kandahar when this attack took place at around 11:00 this morning and the version of events as we were told were roughly as follows. there was a meeting of tribal elders under way that involved several dozen people. this is very normal for somebody in ahmed wali karzai's presence. someone who was a distant relative and worked for the karzai family about ten years. a man named sardar mohammed. he entered the meeti
when negotiations with the taliban move forward and it also may have very big repercussions for the u.s. effort in the south. people called president hamid karzai's brother a corrupt gangster. but the cia's former head of counterterrorism says the u.s. may miss him. >> it's quite like live that what follows is going to be something that will not work to our interest. >> reporter: an afghan official says he was gunned down in his own home, shot in the head and chest by his own guard. the taliban took credit, but it's not clear if the shooter was really working for them. >> the united states condemns in the strongest possible terms the murder of president karzai's half brother in kandahar. >> a u.s. official said quote, while we must deal with ahm ahmed wali karzai, he's widely understood to be corrupt and narcotics trafficker. the state department and u.s. military were trying to build trust in the afghan government. they frequently criticized ahmed wali, but the cia worked with him. >> i think often parts of the u.s. government were working at cross purposes where ahmed wali was conce
-- get this -- the taliban? we have details of a disturbing new report. >>> the death toll is at 76 in the massive blast and shooting in norway. the suspect behind the attack was in court today, defending his alleged motives. let's bring in michael holmes from norway with the very latest. what is going on right now, 34r50i michael? >> right now, they just had this memorial march. a couple hundred thousand people marched with flowers from the city square down here to the cathedral. in court today, though, it was quite an odd sort of situation early on. the media thought they were going to be able to get in. the police didn't want them to come in because they were worried about him making a message to to possible co-conspirators. let's show you how the day unfolded, wolf. >> dozens of journalists from around the world gathered at the courthouse. the judge asked for a closed room. flart references made by the accused in his statements to police and to the court hearing have given statements that require further court investigation, including a statement about, quote, two more cells in
for their ability to move forward with the anti-taliban campaign. they held their nos because this guy was corrupt dealing in the drug trade, although he denied the allegations but it was believed he was fueling the drug trade, as well as profiting from private security contractors as well. it is something that is going to worry the u.s. about the stability of afghanistan and of the region and it will benefit the taliban. >> zain verjee, definitely a story we will continue to keep following and see what impact it does have on politics there. of course, his brother, the president. >>> the man with a huge collection of presidential memorabilia apparently tried to add to it illegally. we will tell you what went down. >>> crew members from the international space station have started their space walk. wait until you see and hear what they are working on. [ barks ] ♪ [ cat meows ] ♪ [ whistles ] ♪ [ cat meows ] ♪ [ ting! ] [ male announcer ] travelers can help you protect the things you care about and save money with multi-policy discounts. are you getting the coverage you need and the discount
action against the taliban as well as al qaeda. meanwhile, secretary panetta told reporters on the plane it's time to focus on defeating al qaeda once and for all. >> i think we had undermined their ablthd to conduct 9/11-type attacks. we had them on the run. >> secretary panetta met with american military officials. atia abawi is in afghanistan. good morning. bring us up to date. >> good morning. panetta's very first trip as secretary of defense to afghanistan, before he landed he brought up the situation with al qaeda. he said, quote, the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach. this is a time to go after him, especially after bin laden. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden, to put maximum pressure on them because i do believe that, if we continue this effort, that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> panetta said that, in fact, in that information they found from bin laden's compound it points to 10 to 20 key leaders of al qaeda in different places such as pakistan, yemen, somalia and different parts of africa. but coming b
is at the >>> the taliban is claiming responsibility for the assassination of the brother of afghan president hamid karzai. all the sources and countries around the world are not necessarily believing that. he was the younger half brother of the afghan president, he was extremely influential in southern afghanistan, but very controversial too. karzai was rumored to be involved with the opium trade. karzai helped nato forces bring local leaders and the taliban to the negotiating table. he was shot and killed at home today by his bodyguard. the taliban has claimed responsibility for that attack as noted. but there is skepticism about whether or not they really had anything to do with it. >>> president obama met with congressional leaders late this afternoon in another effort to reach a deal on the nation's debt limit. republicans proposed a short term deal, it runs out when the president's term expires. steve handlesman reports. >>> as republicans turned up the heat on him, president obama wand if there's no deal to raise the debt limit, 20 billion in social security benefits, payments to veterans and the l
planned. u.s. officials say they killed 120 insurgents. many taliban, but several of them arabs linked to al qaeda damaging their network. the clashes reveal that al qaeda for years, said to be mostly across the border in pakistan is a concern back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we pushed down into the valley, still an insurgent strong hold. high-tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them from the valley. >> it's uncharacteristic from the taliban i know. they're getting gutsy. right past there. if you go past that you're going to take enemy contact, it's pretty certain. >> the afghans are clear about who lay in weight for them ahead. >> translator: it's very dangerous, there are taliban, arabs, pakistanis there. >> at the foot of the valley, the american base is often hit by pot shots, sometimes from lone gunmen up high who they then mortar. al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network that made america's case for invading. nick payton walsh, cnn a
in addition of karzai's brother's assassination, it is still the same thing. >>shepard: the taliban are still, in large part, with their judicial system on wheels, and still have much in control in many places? >>guest: yes, but the taliban is shifting. they are trying to get back into power but, at the same time, the north has form add new political alliance that will never let the taliban rule so we are headed for a divisive period in politics over the next two or three years. >>shepard: what is your sense as this wraps up, what might have been accomplished? >>guest: we have shifted afghanistan toward america's values and ideas and when you go to kabul or kandahar and walk around people feel like they are part of the world and no longer buried in a draconian regime. we have done an amazing amount of good work with the infrastructure projects. but we took that country from zero to 60 in 10 years so you will see a lot, a lot, a lot of fighting and infighting, as well, much like when the russians left. people will make grabs for power in the power vacuum. so both good and bad. >>shepard: we're
's speculation of everybody from the cia to drug lords to the taliban. >> absolutely. that speculation is still runs. it's not clear whether his absence will have that big of a stabilizing effect. from the united states point of view karzai's brother caused a lot of problems, he was always playing a double game, but he managed a lot of relationships. he had the charisma to maintain that network. for karzai. that was crucial. you can see how karzai really needed a counterbalance to the taliban when it came to now we have to see who can fill that void try to manage those relationship nots to mention the lucrative narcotics routes to try to maintain the piece while u.s. forces are there. more importantly, though, the real focus we have is the u.s./pakistani negotiation and whether pakistan can come through in developing some sort of accommodate with the taliban that would allow the u.s. to disengage. >> dave, go ahead. >> what is the impact of the united states drawing down in afghanistan? i'm talking about police actions and espionage, which we can pursue anyway. what is the impact of us drawing
discovered during a trip to remote afghanistan, there are signs that the taliban and al qaeda see an opening. >> reporter: we pushed down into the valley. still an insurgent stronghold. high-tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them from up the valley. >> it's uncharacteristic for the taliban around here. they're getting gutsy. if you push up farther than that, you're going to take enemy contact. it's pretty certain. >> nick payton walsh joins us from kabul. the lieutenant said the taliban is getting, quote, pretty gutsy. where does this confidence come from, and does it it stem in part from the fact they know the americans are leaving? >> reporter: i think that's true to a certain extent. the gutsiness is perhaps a suggestion that some fighters there are foreign. u.s. officials identifying what they believe were safe havens there before they launched a large operation into that particular area. the focus was on pakistan's safe havens there. that where many in washington believe al qaeda was hiding. big concerns they naif found a breathing space in afghani
of the taliban. how did it happen? anananananann] this...is the network. a living, breathing intelligence that's helping drive the future of business. in here, inventory can be taught to learn. ♪ machines have a voice. ♪ medical history follows you. it's the at&t network -- a network of possibilities... committed to delivering the most advanced mobile broadband experience to help move business... forward. ♪ >>> it just may be the most egregious example to date of widespread corruption in afghanistan. american taxpayer money, hundreds of millions of dollars, ending up in the hands of the taliban. a year-long u.s. military task force discovered that the money was siphoned from a $2 billion transportation contract to provide most of the supplies to american troops. a source with knowledge of the investigation has briefed cnn about how it all went down. we are joined now from the afghan capital, kabul. just tell us briefly, how did this happen? >> reporter: this is coming from an internal report, but basically what happened was trucking companies subcontracted out to local entities here, who
where we are training security forces and where we are working to provide stability against the taliban and the kind of structure that we need to support going after al qaeda in pakistan and afghanistan -- that perhaps it is time to shut down $17 billion worth of money going to reconstruction projects when our track record really stings. i hope you all will convince me i am too cynical and angry and frustrated about the way we are spending money in theater. and i want to tell you, i am looking for good news and i hope we hear some today. there are too many people in missouri saying why can we fix this road, and then i look of the projects we are doing in afghanistan and it is very hard to explain to them why we can't fix that the road because we can't afford it -- yet we can throw money away in afghanistan on projects that were clearly not sustainable. and anybody spend any time thinking about it in the first place we would realize that. that kind of planning has to begin happening and that kind of accountability has to be present. senator portman is here. i will give him a time to get
or ultimately like the taliban. we need to have a change in direction in washington and brussebru brus brussels. >> we can create secular, christians in egypt and moderate and secular. >> that is the hope and prayer of egyptian christians and secularists. a political movement and pressure from the west to keep democratic revolution moving forward. gary lane cab can be news, cairo, egypt. >> visit us at cwnews.org. we'll be back right after this. >> it is a sad fact hundreds of unwanted babies abandoned on the streetsover seoul, south korea and many don't survive. >> to set up a way for unwanted babies, news partners, cgnt v in seoul. >> on this street in seoul korea, a sign says place to leave babies. this is a baby box. a thick towel covers the bottom and lights and heating keep a baby comfortable. a bell rings when somebody puts a baby in the box and a helper comes to move a baby inside. this past year, 6 infants or small children rescued here. fiscally or mentally handicapped or from unmarried mothers. >> this note says he has this handicapped. i am sorry i am not able to raise this baby. i
rocket projectile, that results in the american troops and have given long-range rockets to taliban in afghanistan and increasing the insurgents' ability to hit u.s. and coalition positions from a safer position." in june, 14 u.s. service members were killed in combat in iraq and officials attribute the death to militias trained by the iran revolutionary guard. senator, what do we do about iran? >> well, i think people need to understand why iran is doing this. the biggest nightmare for the ayatollah in iran is to have a democracy in iraq and afghanistan on their borders. so, yes, they are helping the taliban and trying to react to bring down the iraqi democracy and trying to undermine the efforts here. they're responsible for material coming in both countrys killing not only the american soldiers but the iraqi and afghan people. they are helping assad in syria. i hope people understand what iran is up to. their biggest nightmare is that the arab spring is successful, that we can pull off iraq and afghanistan in terms of representative democracy. they are going to fight to the bitte
, the u.s. cut of $800 million in aid to pakistan. it turns out the taliban is claiming responsibility for the assassination of the half brother of the afghan president hamid karzai. ahmad wali karza was considered by many to be the most powerful man in afghanistan. his bodyguards killed the attacker. coming up on abc-seven usenews at noon new details in the privacy scandal affecting the world's biggest media mogul. and, a facelift for a local shelter. volunteers are making major changes. but first our >> fire officials are investigating a fire that destroyed a manhattan synagogue last night. firefighter suffered minor injuries when the roof collapsed. the fire left much of the upper east side blanketed in smoke. the historic synagogue was undergoing renovations, and now the congregation wants to rebuild. >>> today is the last space walk of the shuttle missions. ♪ i love you more than the sun and the stars in the sky. ♪ astronauts are currently working to retrieve a broken ammonia pump. they will end their 13-day mission next week, marking an end to the shuttle program. >>> in bri
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 296 (some duplicates have been removed)